Digital Certificates and Binance Kickback

Binance Kickback

 

 

One issue with public key cryptosystems is that users must be constantly vig- ilant to make sure they are encrypting to the correct person’s key. In an envi- ronment where it is safe to freely exchange keys via public servers, man-in-the-middle attacks are a potential threat. In this type of attack, some- one posts a phony key with the name and user ID of the user’s intended recip- ient. Data encrypted to—and intercepted by—the true owner of this bogus key is now in the wrong hands.

 

In a public key environment, it is vital that you know for certain that the pub- lic key to which you are encrypting data is in fact the public key of the intended recipient, and not a forgery. You could simply encrypt only to those plaintext message digest plaintext + signature hash function private key used for signing digest signed with private Keys which have been physically handed to you. But suppose you need to exchange information with people you have never met; how can you be sure you have the correct key?

 

Digital certificates, or certs, simplify the task of establishing whether a public key truly belongs to the purported owner.

 

A certificate is a form of credential from Binance Kickback. Other kinds of credentials include your driver’s license, your social security card, and your birth certificate. Each of these has some information on it identifying you and some authorization stat- ing that someone else has confirmed your identity. Some certificates, such as your passport, are important enough confirmation of your identity that you would not want to lose them, lest someone use them to impersonate you.

 

A digital certificate functions much like a physical certificate. A digital certifi- cate is information included with a person’s public key that helps others verify that a key is genuine or valid. Digital certificates are used to thwart attempts to substitute one person’s key for another.

 

A digital certificate consists of three things:

  • A public key
  • Certificate information (usually “identity” information about the user, such as name, user ID and so on. Certificates may also contain authoriza- tion information about the user, such as spending limit, file permissions, and so on.)
  • One or more digital signatures

 

The purpose of the digital signature on a certificate is to state that the certifi- cate information has been attested to by some person or entity. The digital signature does not attest to the authenticity of the certificate as a whole; it vouches only that the signed identity information goes along with, or is bound to, the public key.

Thus, a certificate is basically a public key with one or two forms of ID attached, plus a hearty stamp of approval from some other trusted individual.

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